View and Change Status of OBI Components in OBIEE 12c-Part 1

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Blog | Oct 13, 2017

View and Change Status of OBI Components in OBIEE 12c-Part 1

Understanding the state /management of OBIEE component processes is essential not only for performing a range of maintenance operations, but for diagnosing and resolving of performance issues. This blog will review these items in detail. Click here to read Part 2...

Introduction:
In this two part blog series, I will be discussing how to stop, start and view the status of the OBI (Oracle Business Intelligence) Component Processes in OBIEE 12c using command line and Graphical User Interface (GUI).

Understanding the state /management of OBIEE component processes is essential not only for performing a range of maintenance operations, but for diagnosing and resolving of performance issues. This blog will review these items in detail.

In the first part we will cover the use of commands. Let us start with stopping OBI component processes in a domain.

  1. STOP

The command is entered to run the stop script. The script is located in DOMAIN_HOME/bitools/bin

The command on Windows is:

stop.cmd {-I < instances>} {-r}       E.g., stop.cmd-iobis1,obips1

and on UNIX is:

 ./stop.sh{-I < instances>} {-r}        E.g., ./stop.sh-iobis1,obips1

where -i < instances> enables us to specify instances to shut down in a comma-separated list and -r stops the remote Node Managers.

obi component processes

When the instances are not specified, the command shuts down everything - administration server, managed server and all system components by default.

  1. START

The START script is also located in the same abode as the STOP script - DOMAIN_HOME/bitools/bin

On Windows:     start.cmd {-noprompt} {-i<instances>} {-r}               E.g., ./start.cmd -iobis1, obips1

On UNIX:   ./start.sh {-noprompt} {-i<instances>} {-r}                E.g., ./start.sh -iobis1, obips1, where –i <instances> enables us to specify instances to start up in a comma-separated list and -r starts the remote Node Managers.

The system will display a list of all the inactive components to be started and the components will be started in order. The list of started components and status of all components is displayed.

start obi processes

Specifying no instances as arguments in the command starts all inactive components including the administration server, managed server, all the system components and local node manager by default. It will not fail if something is already running. On using STOP command a failover may be caused for specific processes.

The START command completes on successful start of all the component processes either on the first run, or after they fail consecutively to start three times.

  1. VIEW STATUS

To view the status of the components within a domain, we use the following command located in DOMAIN_HOME/bitools/bin

On Windows:     status.cmd {-v}

On UNIX:   ./status.sh {-v}    ,where{-v} is verbose

This command generates a report with

  • Component name
  • Type
  • Status
  • Machine name

    obi view status

    Points to remember:

    • All the three above commands run only from the Master Host
    • While running these commands, you must have a file system permissions and should know the system administrator identity credentials to boot WebLogic Server which are prompted for initially. For subsequent runs we do not require credentials; a boot identity file is automatically created by the command.
    • Running of Node Manager
      • For STOP command - The Node Manager must be running. It does not stop remote Node Manager Processes, unless –r is specified in the command.
      • For START command - The Remote Node Managers must be running. It does not start remote Node Managers (on a clustered server), however, starts the local Node Manager if not already running.
      • For STATUS command – Local Node Manager processes must be running

    Conclusion:

    With this we come to the end of Part 1 of the blog series, I hope this helped you to understand the command line process to do the necessary actions- starting, stopping and viewing of the status of OBI components. In Part two I will discuss the GUI approach for accomplishing the above discussed tasks. For any questions on Part 1, click below:
    Ask Dharmendra